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PBDB can help you discover dinosaurs!

The Paleobiology Database

The Paleobiology Database (PBDB) is a non-governmental, non-profit public resource for paleontological data. It has been organized and operated by a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional, international group of paleobiological researchers. Its purpose is to provide global, collection-based occurrence and taxonomic data for organisms of all geological ages, as well data services to allow easy access to data for independent development of analytical tools, visualization software, and applications of all types. The Database’s broader goal is to encourage and enable data-driven collaborative efforts that address large-scale paleobiological questions.”

A 10-Year-Old Unlocks His Mom’s iPhone X

faces converge

“Hacking Face ID, the facial recognition system built into Apple’s iPhone X, isn’t easy. Unless, it turns out, you’re a very specific hacker—say, a rare 10-year-old kid, trying to break into the phone of whichever of your parents looks the most like you.

Attaullah Malik and Sana Sherwani made that discovery earlier this month, when their fifth-grade son, Ammar Malik, walked into the bedroom of their Staten Island home to admire their new pair of iPhone Xs just after they’d set up Face ID. “There’s no way you’re getting access to this phone,” the older Malik remembers his wife telling her son, in a half-joking show of strictness.

Malik offered to let Ammar look at his phone instead, but the boy picked up his mother’s, not knowing which was which. And a split second after he looked at it, the phone unlocked.” Read more about it at Wired.com.

Russian hackers exploit a potential Microsoft Office flaw

hackers

The DDE attack only works when Windows’ Protected Mode setting is disabled, and if user clicks through prompts that the attack requires.

“On Tuesday, researchers at McAfee revealed that they’ve been tracking a new phishing campaign from the Russia-linked hacker team. Security researchers have recently shown that a feature of Microsoft Office known as Dynamic Data Exchange can be exploited to install malware on a victim’s computer when they simply open any Office document. McAfee now says APT28 has used that DDE vulnerability since late October. And while the targets McAfee has detected so far are in Germany and France, the hackers have been fooling victims into clicking with file names that reference US-focused topics: both a US Army exercise in Eastern Europe known as SabreGuardian and last week’s ISIS truck attack that killed eight people on a Manhattan bike path.” Read more about it at Wired.

Microsoft helps veterans build new careers

military veteran

Microsoft offers an 18-week educational program that prepares military veterans for a career in the technology industry. More than 240 companies have become hiring partners that seek out MSSA graduates.

“Several years ago, a group of employees at Microsoft who had gone through the military-to-civilian adjustment themselves wondered: What if there was a way to transform a perceived weakness or lack of experience into a new set of talents? How could veterans maximize their strengths—grit, systems savvy, strong decision making, and steadfastness—and build needed skills on top of that? How could they connect with organizations who needed them and communities where they could feel like they belonged?

The answer came into focus: inspired and motivated by stories like Sanderson’s, Microsoft started a unique training program called Microsoft Software & Systems Academy (MSSA) in 2013, an effort which soon led to a the broader Military Affairs program to support veterans across the company.

From its inception, MSSA had the mission not only to inspire veterans to transform their lives, but also to help address a key challenge facing the technology world: the vast skills gap between the hundreds of thousands of needed computing jobs and the far fewer trained professionals entering the workforce.”

Read more about the program at goo.gl/SwQMkd.

Telemedicine Is Forcing Doctors to Learn ‘Webside’ Manner

webside manner

An expert in the burgeoning field of telemedicine, Steinhorn believes in the power of digital tools to connect clinicians with their patients. But more important than the technology, he says, is what clinicians in the field have taken to calling “webside” manner. It’s a modern twist on bedside manner—a physician’s ability to relate with a patient and convey their desire to help. “My experience is that, once you get past some initial hurdles, you can maintain an intimate, immediate connection with patients that in some cases may be more therapeutically useful than even in-person interactions,” Steinhorn says.

Read more about it at Wired.