Blog

Virtual reality toy becoming training tool

CMSWire reports that virtual reality is now more than just a toy. It’s slowly being accepted as a remote training tool in the workplace.

“The role of virtual reality and augmented reality in the enterprise was always going to depend on affordability and accessibility. No one ever really doubted their use as business tools, but even for large enterprises with a lot of capital behind them and for much of their development, both technologies have been out the reach of most … But that is changing and the technology is now at a point where the business benefits are clear, whether that comes from helping to improve productivity, or it involves connecting with customers in new and ways, and ensuring that businesses are employing the right people, with the right skills.”

Read more about it at CMS Wire.

Schedule a video conference with your doctor

If you have a good internet connection and a smartphone or computer, then you can schedule a telehealth appointment and talk to your medical provider via Zoom or Skype.

“At Fox Chase, our providers are contacting patients before their appointments if telehealth is an option for them. If so, they’ll get a text message or email that provides a link to the online appointment. During the appointment, if connectivity is an issue, the patient and their clinician can stop the video and continue the visit via phone call.”

Read more about telehealth and video calls at Fox Chase Cancer Center.

BMW uses quantum computer to find car parts faster

BMW is using a Honeywell quantum computer to find quicker ways to purchase vehicle components. In case you didn’t know, quantum computers store and process data using qubits, thereby making them better at processing a multitude of possible solutions to a problem.

According to Stephen Shankland at Cnet, “Quantum computers are profoundly different from classical machines. They store and process data using qubits. Qubits can store a combination of one and zero, rather than simply a one and a zero, as classical computers work. In addition, multiple qubits can be yoked together through a phenomenon called entanglement. That lets qubits encompass a multitude of possible solutions to a problem. With the right processing algorithm shepherding qubit interactions, bad solutions in effect cancel each other out, allowing good answers emerge.”

Read more about quantum computers and qubits at Cnet.

Interland helps kids become safe, confident explorers of the online world

Interland is a free, web-based game that teaches kids how to safely explore the online world.

“Kids are invited to play their way to Internet Awesome in a quest to deny hackers, sink phishers, one-up cyberbullies, outsmart oversharers and become safe, confident explorers of the online world.”

Kids explore four lands with key learning objectives: Reality River – Don’t Fall for Fake, Mindful Mountain – Share with Care, Kind Kingdom – It’s cool to be kind, and Tower of Treasure – Secure your secrets.

Smart Collar Translates Your Dog’s Barking Using AI

Petpuls is a smart collar that tracks your dog’s location and claims to detect whether your dog is relaxed, anxious, angry, sad or happy.

This collar may remind you of the “talking” dog in the movie “Up: a tall adventure.”

According to Entrepreneur, “The startup Petpuls presented the ingenious necklace at the Consumer Electronics show (CES) 2021 . The creators explained that, in addition to tracking the physical activity and rest of the dogs, the accessory can detect five canine emotions. This is achieved by including microphones and a voice recognition technology , to monitor barking.”

Smart watches can detect symptoms of COVID-19 before wearer knows they are infected

Medical Xpress reported that a team of researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai found evidence that smart watches may be able to detect COVID-19 symptoms before a person knows they’re infected. The team at Mount Sinai tested 297 healthcare workers by looking at data from their Apple Watches.

“One of the early signs of a COVID-19 infection is inflammation in infected areas of the body. And when inflammation begins, the body responds by slightly altering blood flow. That change in blood flow can be seen in slight changes to a person’s heartbeat, detectable via smart watches like the one from Apple. By noting a person’s heartbeat over long periods of time, a smart watch can determine a normal baseline for the person wearing the watch. And when a sudden prolonged change happens, such as sustained heart rate variability, the device can detect that, too. In the test at Mount Sinai, the volunteers were asked to wear the smart watch full-time and also to install a watch app that specifically looked for sustained changes in their heartbeat. The researchers found that the watches were able to identify two-thirds of those people who were infected an average of seven days before the volunteers noticed any symptoms.”

Covid-19 causes PC sales to skyrocket

PC Mag reports that 2020 was the biggest year for PC demand in a decade even though desktop sales fell. One of the biggest sellers were Google Chromebooks, which tend to cost less than $500. Chromebook shipments in North America increased by 80% in 2020. According to the research firm IDC, the world hasn’t seen this increased demand for tech since smartphones came out ten years ago.

LUCI makes wheelchairs safer

A mom and dad wanted a better wheelchair with safety features for their daughter. It didn’t exist. So the dad and uncle built LUCI , smart technology that you can add on to your existing power wheelchair that provides stability, security, and connectivity.. What a great use of technology. Learn about the family’s story and how they created LUCI at www.luci.com.

Sweater Design? Gin Rummy? Typing? These Are The Mario Games You’ve Never Heard Of

“But buried deep within Mario’s history are some games that found the Nintendo superstar stepping out of his comfort zone and jumping into some very surprising series. You wouldn’t expect the Goomba-slaying plumber to be the poster child for a sewing simulator, but in the late ’80s, that’s exactly what happened. We also saw Mario playing tabletop games and teaching typing over the years.” Read more about it at NPR.